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                                                    AMALGAMATION BETWEEN

                                    MANKIND AND MANKIND

                                    ANIMALS AND ANIMALS,                                       PLANTS AND PLANTS

AND, TODAY, EVEN ATTEMPTS BETWEEN MAN AND THE ANIMALS


Revised 08-20-12   Rochester

Posted 08-26-2005

COLOR CODE:


RED FONT = THE MOST HOLY KJV BIBLE


BROWN FONT = THE MOST HOLY SHEPHERD’S ROD MESSAGE THROUGH Bro V.T. Houteff.


PURPLE FONT = THE ADDITIONAL CODES ( NEW CODES ), OF THE SHEPHERD’S ROD MESSAGE.


BLUE FONT = THE MOST HOLY SPIRIT OF PROPHECY THROUGH Sister Ellen Gould White.


FUCHCIA FONT = THE MOST PRECIOUS 1888 MESSAGE – ( TM 91-92 }.


GREEN FONT = My Own Personal Commentary or the Commentary of Others.


NAVY FONT = Any Other Source of Information, Dictionary, Encyclopedia, Etc.

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NOTE: THE FONT IS CAPITALIZED WHEN SPEAKING OF GOD AND HIS TRUTH.


THE FONT IS ENLARGED AND CAPITALIZED, AT TIMES, TO EMPHASIZE THE POINT.

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amal•gam•ation \€-'mal-g€-"mÀ-sh€n\ noun (1612)

1 a : the action or process of amalgamating : uniting

b : the state of being amalgamated

2 : the result of amalgamating : amalgam

3 : consolidation, merger <amalgamation of two corporations>

©1996 Zane Publishing, Inc. and Merriam-Webster, Incorporated. All rights reserved

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You may be wondering why I have chosen, IN THE LORD, the subject of Amalgamation for Discussion and Study.

The main reason is that Amalgamation, or cloning, as we think of it, today, was the chief cause for THE LORD BRINGING ABOUT THE FLOOD TO CLEANSE the earth of as many of the manifestations of sin as possible, at that time.

Based upon that above fact, as seen from, THE SPIRIT OF PROPHECY QUOTE, which is included below, and then, upon the current events in the world regarding all the scientific experimenting going on with people and animals, and plants and the cloning, and DNA experimenting, etc, it is my firm belief that we are, MOST DEFINITELY, in the end times, AND THAT THE CLOSING OF THE PLAN OF SALVATION AND THEN, THE RETURN OF THE LORD JESUS CHRIST ARE NOT FAR AWAY, but, well within the lifetime of the majority of people who read this.

I have also included, after THE HOLY BIBLE AND SPIRIT OF PROPHECY AND SHEPHERD'S ROD STATEMENTS, below, serveral articles describing the many scientific experiments, active in the world today, as additional evidence to support this belief.


Brother Randahl

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THE SPIRIT OF PROPHECY

Feb. 20, 2001, 3rd day

18. Amalgamation Brought Noxious Plants.--Not one noxious plant was placed in the Lord's great garden, but after Adam and Eve sinned, poisonous herbs sprang up. In the parable of the sower the question was asked the Master, "Didst not thou sow good seed in thy field? how then hath it tares?" The Master answered, "An enemy hath done this." All tares are sown by the evil one. Every noxious herb is of his sowing, and by his ingenious methods of amalgamation he has corrupted the earth with tares (MS 65, 1899) [published in F. D. Nichol, Ellen G. White and Her Critics]. {1BC 1086.2}

Remedies That Cleanse the System.--Christ never planted the seeds of death in the system. Satan planted these seeds when he tempted Adam to eat of the tree of knowledge which meant disobedience to God. Not one noxious plant was placed in the Lord's great garden, but after Adam and Eve sinned, poisonous herbs sprang up. In the parable of the sower the question was asked the master, "Didst not thou sow good seed in thy field? from whence then hath it tares?" The master answered, "An enemy hath done this" (Matt. 13:27, 28). All tares are sown by the evil one. Every noxious herb is of his sowing, and by his ingenious methods of amalgamation he has corrupted the earth with tares. {2SM 288.2}

Every species of animal which God had created were preserved in the ark. The confused species which God did not create, which were the result of amalgamation, were destroyed by the flood. Since the flood there has been amalgamation of man and beast, as may be seen in the almost endless varieties of species of animals, and in certain races of men. {3SG 75.2}

But if there was one sin above another which called for the destruction of the race by the flood, it was the base crime of amalgamation of man and beast which defaced the image of God, and caused confusion everywhere. God purposed to destroy by a flood that powerful, long-lived race that had corrupted their ways before him. He would not suffer them to live out the days of their natural life, which would be hundreds of years. It was only a few generations back when Adam had access to that tree which was to prolong life. After his disobedience he was not suffered to eat of the tree of life and perpetuate a life of sin. In order for man to possess an endless life he must continue to eat of the fruit of the tree of life. Deprived of that tree, his life would gradually wear out. {1SP 69.1} of man and beast which defaced the image of God, and caused confusion everywhere. God purposed to destroy by a flood that powerful, long-lived race that had corrupted their ways before him. He would not suffer them to live out the days of their natural life, which would be hundreds of years. It was only a few generations back when Adam had access to that tree which was to prolong life. After his disobedience he was not suffered to eat of the tree of life and perpetuate a life of sin. In order for man to possess an endless life he must continue to eat of the fruit of the tree of life. Deprived of that tree, his life would gradually wear out. {1SP 69.1}

After Noah had come forth from the ark, he looked around upon the powerful and ferocious beasts which he brought out of the ark, and then upon his family numbering eight, and was greatly afraid that they would be destroyed by the beasts. But the Lord sent his angel to say to Noah, "The fear of you, and the dread of you, shall be upon every beast of the earth, and upon every fowl of the air, upon

76

all that moveth upon the earth, and upon all the fishes of the sea; into your hands are they delivered. Every moving thing that liveth shall be [meat] for you; even as the green herb have I given you all things." {3SG 75.3}

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THE SHEPHERD'S ROD MESSAGE

HAS THERE BEEN AMALGAMATION OF MAN AND BEAST?

Question No. 253:

"Since the flood," says Mrs. White, "there has been amalgamation of man and beast, as may be seen in almost endless varieties of species of animals, and in certain races of men."--Spiritual Gifts, Vol. 3, p. 75 (1864.).

Answer:

The very fact that the interpretation given Sister White's statement on amalgamation, does result in a biological absurdity such as only the most ignorant and most foolish could subscribe to, is the best evidence that her words are grossly perverted. Whatever one may insist about the grammatical meaning of the phrase, "amalgamation of man and beast," the fact remains evident in the light of what she writes elsewhere on the subject, and in the background of common sense, as well as of her wide understanding of the Bible, along with her early inexperience with words, that she is trying to show two kinds of amalgamation--one among the various races of man, the other among the various genera and species of animals: as for instance, the Hebrew with the Canaanite, and the ass with the horse, resulting in a hybrid race in the one instance, and a hybrid species in the other instance. She herself explains: "Every species of animal which God has created were preserved in the ark. The confused species which God did not create, which were the result of amalgamation, were destroyed by the flood."--Spiritual Gifts, p. 75.

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Several Additional Souces of Information

Goats with spider gene produce webs

By E.W. KIECKHEFER

http://www.vny.com/cf/News/upidetail.cfm?QID=87148

MILWAUKEE, May 18, 2000 (UPI) - Canadian scientists have implanted spider genes in a herd of goats, resulting in the production of silky strands in goat milk that can be used for sutures and other applications.

The technique was perfected by Jeffrey Turner, a geneticist and president of Nexia Biotechnologies of Quebec.

"We have combined the old and the new," Turner told UPI in a recent interview. "The old is represented by the goats and their milk, which is used to make cheese. The new is genetic engineering."

In addition to sutures for eye surgery, the strands - which are harvested from the goat’s milk—can be used to reconstruct tendons or ligaments and to repair bones, Turner said, adding that companies like DuPont and 3M have been trying unsuccessfully to duplicate spider web silk in their laboratories for years.

Turner said he has been contacted by numerous pharmaceutical firms seeking to acquire the technique but he said he won’t sell.

"We may take on a partner for the marketing end," he said, "but we will keep the ownership here in Quebec."

One major reason for that decision is the fact that Quebec’s Caisse de depot et placement, which is responsible for investing Quebec pension funds, has invested several million dollars in the venture. Turner, a native of Ontario, said he decided to base his venture in Quebec because of the province’s favorable economic climate.

Turner estimates the technology has a potential market of $2 billion. He expects the silk to go on the medical market within a year under the brand name BioSteelJ.

Additionally, he said, the substance likely has industrial applications, possibly replacing such things as Kevlar. It also could be used to cover domed stadiums and in the aerospace and communications industries.

Both the U.S. and Canadian military have expressed interest in using it for making anti-ballistic defense systems, he said.

Copyright 2000 by United Press International. All rights reserved.

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HUMAN ORGANS TO BE CLONED IN BRITAIN

HUMAN ORGANS TO BE CLONED IN BRITAIN

http://www.newsoftheworld.co.uk/news/1634980

BREAKING NEWS

By IAN KIRBY, Political correspondent

EXPERIMENT: Scientists cloned a human ear on the back of a mouse {picture--ugh!}

THE controversial cloning of human organs is to be given the go-ahead by the government.

British scientists will be the first in the world to be allowed to develop the technology which will enable them to "grow" organs in other animals.

The first human parts - cloned from a patient's stem cells - could be used for heart, lung, liver or kidney transplants within the next SIX YEARS.

Stem cells are the ones containing a genetic imprint which tells other cells what body part they should become.

If successful, artificially created replacement organs could always be available and end the heart-rending search for a human donor.

Health Secretary Alan Milburn and Home Secretary Jack Straw are set to draw up changes in the law which will make the medical miracle possible.

Experiments on human stem cells are only allowed for 14 days at the moment.

Under the new proposals there will be no time limit, and scientists will be allowed to graft the cells into embryonic animal cells where they can developed.

When the animal grows, any organ genetically altered will contain a full human DNA pattern and be suitable for transplant.

Strict

The government will make sure there are strict clauses in the law to ensure the full cloning of idential humans remains outlawed.

But the dramatic change is still expected to cause a moral uproar among pro-life campaigners and religious groups.

They will argue it is morally wrong for scientists to "play God".

But ministers decided they must act after reading a secret report from the government's chief medical officer, Liam Donaldson, last week.

He said the massive medical advances possible after a change in the law far outweigh any moral obejections.

Leaders

He urged the government to make a bold step and turn British scientists into world leaders in the field.

In the report, Mr Donaldson pointed out the technology will end the heart-breaking ordeal many people face when suffering a serious illness - the knowledge they will die unless a donor organ is found.

Last night, a senior Health Department insider told the News of the World : "The important thing is people don't get stuck on the word 'cloning' with its strange connotations and recognise this is incredibly important."

But replacement organs could be just the tip of the iceberg.

Using a different form of cloning, a scientist in America produced a human ear on the back of a mouse.

But experts say they will soon be able to develop cloned brain cells for patients suffering from Parkinson's disease.

The treated cells would replace damaged ones, giving a patient a chance of longer life.

White blood cells could also be developed to aid leukaemia sufferers.

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Dolly the sheep led the way

THE incredible technology set to help humans is similar to that used to create cloned animals like Dolly the Sheep.

In that process, carried out at the Roslin Institute in Scotland, cells from a ewe embryo were fertilised in a laboratory then grafted into the womb of Dolly's mother.

Those cells eventually grew into a foetus, and in time Dolly the Sheep was born... identical in every way to the donor ewe.

Earlier this year, the same group of scientists cloned FIVE piglets.

The team was led by Professor Ian Wilmut.

He said: "We were the people who had the lucky breakthrough.

"It would be a great shame if we miss the opportunity to go on to develop new therapies."

There will also be a massive profit from any cloning project.

Analysts estimate that the first company to produce cloned human tissue will establish a market which will be worth £3.8 BILLION within

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Monkeys genetically modified in the womb

Monday, 22 May, 2000, 16:44 GMT 17:44 UK

Monkeys genetically modified in the womb

http://news2.thls.bbc.co.uk/hi/english/sci/tech/newsid_759000/759243.stm

By BBC News Online science editor Dr David Whitehouse

The possibility of treating human genetic diseases before birth has been raised by a series of experiments on unborn monkeys.

The procedure, the first successful foetal gene transfer in a species closely related to humans, the macaque monkey, suggests

that gene transfer can be accomplished in utero without causing genetic malformations in the offspring.

"The finding holds out the hope that gene therapy can be safely administered to human foetuses to treat genetic diseases,

although such experiments are years away," said Dr Bruce A. Bunnell of the Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio, US.

Bunnell injected 14 macaque foetuses with a light-emitting marker gene derived from jellyfish. Connected to the jellyfish gene

were one of two additional strands of DNA.

These were the murine leukaemia virus (Mlv), a virus commonly used in research, or the HIV-1 virus.

Delivered to term

HIV-1 was chosen because Mlv becomes incorporated only into rapidly dividing cells, whereas HIV-1 reaches the cells of such organs as the liver and brain that are less likely to divide.

Before injection, portions of the HIV-1 virus were deleted to render it harmless.

According to a report given at a research conference organised by the American Academy of Paediatrics, all of the monkeys were carried to term and delivered by caesarean section.

At birth, Dr Bunnell found that all 14 primate infants were healthy and normal, except that they expressed the introduced

marker gene in every cell of their bodies.

However, Dr Bunnell reports that after about one month the monkeys stopped expressing the marker gene for reasons that are unexplained.

Ethical debate

The scientist said it may be that the macaques mounted an immune response to the foreign protein. Until this limitation is understood and overcome, foetal gene therapy cannot have long-term success, he added.

This work is important in developing gene therapy treatments for humans because the macaque foetal development is very similar to the human, except that it occurs slightly swifter.

Although macaques are more difficult to study, the data are more relevant to human genetic disease than data from other species.

The results are encouraging but it should be stressed that they represent just the start of a long series of experiments on animals

before the possibility of trying out the procedure on humans could even be contemplated. An ethical debate would be necessary as well.

If sanctioned, however, it could be possible to repair inherited genetic defects before birth. Diseases such as cystic fibrosis and

muscular dystrophy could one day be tackled this way.

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Cloning teams cross pig and human DNA

October 8 2000 AUSTRALASIA

Cloning teams cross pig and human DNA

http://www.sunday-times.co.uk/news/pages/sti/2000/10/08/stifgnaus01001.html

SCIENTISTS have successfully produced an embryonic pig-human hybrid. Human DNA was inserted into pig cells which

became tiny embryos, write Jonathan Leake and Nick Fielding.

The researchers have not revealed what happened to them, but suggest they could have been grown further by being implanted into a womb - and that either a pig or a human mother would have been suitable.

The intentions of the researchers are not made clear in an application they have submitted to the European Patent Office.

However, such embryos would be ideal for research into therapeutic cloning, when cells are cloned, grown into tissues such as nerve cells and then used to treat a patient.

The researchers, from Stem Cell Sciences in Australia and Biotransplant in America, both big players in the biotechnology

industry, took a cell from a human foetus, extracted the nucleus and then inserted it into a pig's egg cell. Two embryos were grown to the 32-cell stage, which took a week.

Experts in medical ethics are deeply concerned about the patent application, which has a strong chance of being granted. They say the research exploits loopholes in European law. It is not illegal because the embryo is not technically human.

Dr Richard Nicholson, editor of the Bulletin of Medical Ethics, said: "This kind of research depends on devaluing human beings."

Nobody knows whether the hybrid embryos could have be-come living beings. They would be much more human than pig because about 97% of DNA is in the nucleus, which was human. There would, however, be some effect from the 3% of DNA from the pig.

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Cloning may be used to reverse extinction

Cloning may be used to reverse extinction

By Ben Fenton in Washington

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/et?ac=000118613908976&rtmo=V68338SK&atmo=V68338SK&pg=/et/00/10/9/ wclone09.html

GENETIC scientists in the United States claimed yesterday that they could reverse the extinction of animals and announced plans to recreate a lost species of wild goat.

The first step will be in about six weeks, when an ordinary cow on a farm in Iowa will give birth to a gaur, an almost-extinct

breed of wild cow. The scientists said this would herald an attempt to recreate, early in 2001, an extinct species, the bucardo, a mountain goat from Spain.

Animals will be cloned to preserve the species by using genetic material from the last known bucardo, which was killed by a

falling tree in the Ordesa national park in Aragon last January. An emptied egg from another species will be "re-programmed" and the recreated bucardo embryo implanted in a surrogate mother.

The team used this procedure to create a gaur embryo and implant it into an domestic cow called Bessie. The offspring, called Noah, has been closely monitored throughout his gestation and is reported to be healthy, according to a report in the scientific

journal Cloning.The team made more than 600 attempts to create gaur embryos. The healthiest were selected for implanting into a surrogate mother.

However, there is some way yet to go and the research team is aware that cloning generally has a low success rate. Even just after birth, some clones have been known to perish.

Scientists at the Massachusetts firm Advanced Cell Technology are planning an attempt to reverse the extinction of the bucardo. An unspecified number of bucardos will be cloned and, if the experiments are successful, returned to their natural

habitat in a mountainous region of Aragon. The scheme is being run in co-operation with the Spanish government.

Robert Lanza, an ACT spokesman, said: "One hundred species are lost every day and these mass extinctions are mostly our own doing. Now that we have the technology to reverse that, I think we have the responsibility to try."

They are investigating the possibility of cloning other rare animals, including the giant panda and the bongo, an African antelope.

Cloning pandas in the same way that the gaur has apparently been recreated will be extremely difficult because the closest

relatives of the threatened Chinese animal are rabbits and raccoons, both far too small to carry a panda foetus to term.

The company says it hopes to use captive black bears, if it can obtain panda cells. But there is no scientific evidence to show that by implanting a cloned panda embryo into, for instance, a bear, a panda can be born.

The technology has provoked ethical dilemmas and the response to the announcement by ACT contained a mixture of scepticism and outrage.

Oliver Ryder, a geneticist at San Diego Zoo, said: "Society should reflect and consider carefully the potential of this technology and its application and what it can accomplish and what it cannot."

Kent Redford, of the Wildlife Conservation Society in New York, said: "There will be a very hollow echo of a gaur in the birth of that animal to a cow in Iowa.

"To say that is a gaur is to disrespect all gaurs in all places where gaurs live . That animal will never live its life in true gaurdom, to wander in the forests of India and frolic with other gaurs and die and let teak trees grow out of it. "That's the gaur I'm working to save."

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Bizzare: Raelians to Clone Humans

Human Cloning's 'Numbers Game'

Rael, founder of the Raelian religion, announced that his organization will offer a service called CLONAID to provide

assistance to parents willing to have their child cloned. (Andre Forget)

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A39671-2000Oct9.html

By Rick Weiss

Washington Post Staff Writer

Tuesday, October 10, 2000; Page A01

Dressed in white, his thinning hair tied in a bun atop his head, the leader of an obscure religious group stood before a smattering

of onlookers in a Montreal hotel to make what he said was a momentous announcement: His group, which believes that human

cloning is the key to "eternal life," had found a wealthy American couple willing to finance the group's effort to clone a person for the first time.

The leader, a former sportswriter who now calls himself Rael, was flanked by his scientific adviser and five young womenwearing identical necklaces, part of the group's bevy of 50 would-be surrogate mothers who have volunteered to carry cloned human embryos in their wombs. The first to be cloned, Rael said, would be the American couple's child, a 10-month-old girl who recently died from a medical accident, whose cells had been preserved.

"We've got the funding. We anticipate being able to start in October," said Brigitte Boisselier, scientific director for the Raelian religion, which claims to have 50,000 members in 85 countries.

The Raelians offered no evidence that they have any of the medical talent required to reach their goal, or that their claim was anything more than a publicity stunt. Their Sept. 21 announcement went largely unnoticed.

But while no one knows whether this group will really ever try to clone a human being, experts familiar with recent scientific advances say there is no longer much debate that human cloning can be achieved with existing technology. And, in fact, it's probably a group like the Raelians that would be in the best position to pull it off, they said.

That's because the biggest roadblock to human cloning is not that it requires great technical ability--it almost certainly does not--but that it will take many failed pregnancies to get a single success. That, along with society's queasiness about cloning people, has led most mainstream scientific authorities to reject the idea. But a flock of dedicated believers willing to tolerate a few dozen miscarriages along the way could probably clone a person in less than a year, leading scientists said.

"It's a numbers game," said George Seidel, a physiologist and cloning expert at Colorado State University in Fort Collins. "It's very likely that if you did it enough times you could make it work."

The math is straightforward: One female donor can produce about 20 good eggs after a month of hormone treatments. Assume that just five of those eggs can be made into healthy cloned embryos, two embryos are transferred to each surrogate mother, and one out of 100 embryos survives to birth--all reasonable assumptions based on animal data, scientists said. That means 20 human egg donors and 50 surrogate moms would probably be plenty to make a human clone.

Those numbers have brought some experts to the unexpected conclusion that while religious groups have been widely viewed as among the strongest opponents of human cloning, a spiritual group of willing followers might in fact make the perfect human cloning team.

"Just like the Aum Shinrikyo religious group, which recruited highly trained chemists to develop nerve gas for their attack on a Tokyo subway train, I bet that with enough money the Raelians could find the highly trained people they would need to carry out human cloning as well as the numerous women they would need as egg donors and surrogates," said Lee Silver, a

Princeton University molecular biologist who has written extensively about human cloning.

Some experts suspect that people could be cloned even more efficiently than most other animals, because human reproductive chemistry is already so well understood.

"People with experience in in vitro fertilization would probably be able to do it," said Michael West, chief executive officer of

Advanced Cell Technology of Worcester, Mass., a biotechnology company that does not endorse human cloning but has been cloning human embryo cells with the hope of developing new medical treatments. "The directions are all in the scientific literature. They're not top secret."

Cloning involves the production of a genetic twin from a single cell, such as a skin cell, taken from an adult. Cattle, mice and pigs have all been cloned since scientists in Scotland announced the birth of Dolly the sheep in 1996--the first mammal ever cloned from an adult.

In the simplest technique, scientists use an electrical shock to fuse a skin cell from the animal to be cloned to an egg cell whose genes have been removed. The combined cell starts to grow into an embryo that's genetically identical to the skin-cell donor, and that embryo is transferred to a surrogate mother's uterus to develop.

Most pregnancies with clones end in spontaneous abortion--apparently because of abnormalities in the embryo or the placenta, which connects the embryo to the womb. Surprisingly, however, and important for those who wish to clone humans, the procedure appears to be quite safe for the surrogate mothers. Most miscarriages go unnoticed because they occur so early in pregnancy.

Moreover, almost all clones that have survived to birth have been completely normal. Clones have grown up, mated and given birth to normal offspring. The first cloned mouse, Cumulina, died in May at the ripe old age of 2 1/2--six months older than average for her species. That all suggests that if a human clone were to survive fetal development it would probably go on to lead a physically normal life, scientists said.

Psychological health might be another matter. Scientists and philosophers have questioned whether a child who is a genetic twin of his or her parent might suffer from an intergenerational identity crisis. Some also worry that cloned children might be burdened by parental expectations that they turn out like the person from whom they were cloned--an unrealistic hope because the clone would grow up in different circumstances.

That sense of being a replacement for someone else could be an issue for the American couple contracting with Clonaid, the human cloning company founded by the Raelians. The couple are paying about $500,000 to have their dead daughter cloned, said Rael, who was known as Claude Vorilhon before having what he says was an encounter with extraterrestrials in 1973. But the mother will not be one of the surrogate mothers, he said, so if that pregnancy fails she won't have to endure "losing the same child again."

That's a wrongheaded concept, experts said.

"These people feel they're going to be able to replace their daughter by cloning her, but they're wrong," said Jamie Grifo, a fertility specialist at New York University Medical School.

"They want her back, but they're not going to get her back," agreed Paul Berg, the Stanford University biologist who won a Nobel Prize in 1980 for his pioneering work with DNA.

It's impossible to tell if the Raelians really have the means to clone anyone. Boisselier refuses to identify the four scientists she says she has assembled--a biochemist, a geneticist, a cell fusion expert and a French medical doctor. Nor will she identify the American couple.

Even the surrogate volunteers were introduced by their first names only. And Boisselier would not reveal where the effort would occur, other than to say it would be done in a country where human cloning is not illegal.

Human cloning with private funding is not illegal in the United States, but the Food and Drug Administration has said it has the authority to regulate it and approve efforts in advance. That claim has not been tested in court.

In any case, many scientists suspect that fertility specialists in the United States and abroad, who have relatively easy access to spare human eggs, are already toying with cloning techniques in their laboratories, though probably not transferring cloned embryos to women's wombs. Boisselier hinted as much last month when she commented cryptically that the scientists Clonaid has hired "know what they're doing."

Details about the Raelian effort may be in short supply, but money appears to be plentiful at Clonaid. The Raelians, who believe that humans are clones of extraterrestrial scientists, raised about $7 million in donations for a planetary "embassy" three years ago, according to an authoritative Web site on religious movements maintained by University of Virginia sociology

professor-Jeffrey-K.-Hadden (http://cti.itc.virginia.edu/jkh8x/soc257/home.htm) . Additional income comes from UFOland, Rael's theme park near Montreal.

Volunteers are apparently plentiful as well. Hundreds of people have signed up on Clonaid's Web site to be cloned, and the company promises to offer the service for $200,000 once it perfects the method. American scientists say they, too, get many requests from people who want to copy themselves or their loved ones.

"I get letters all the time from people who want to be cloned," said Princeton's Silver. "I have no doubt it will happen very soon."

Special correspondent Nicolas Van Praet in Montreal contributed to this report.

© 2000 The Washington Post Company

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Second Coming Project to Clone Jesus

Thu, 12 Oct 2000

Second Coming Project has a novel idea: clone Jesus

Wednesday, October 11, 2000 By Michael Y. Park

NEW YORK — While Christians believe Jesus Christ will someday return, they probably don't think he'll arrive by way of a petri dish.

http://www.foxnews.com/etcetera/101100/second_coming.sml

Corbis

If The Second Coming Project has its way, we'll know if Jesus really looked like this.

Yet that's exactly what a secretive group called The Second Coming Project is trying to do: clone Jesus. Members of the group see cloning technology as a chance to literally bring Christ to the modern age, find out Exactly how divine he is and perhaps work a miracle.

"I'm hoping it will bring world peace," said a source within the group, which claims 13 or 14 members from a wide range of religions, hometowns and professions. "Not some Armageddon as a tremendous battle where everyone dies, as some people believe."

The group hopes a cloned Jesus fetus could be placed in a female volunteer's womb and then carried to term in a totally immaculate conception. The birth is tentatively scheduled for Dec. 25, 2001, and the mother wouldn't necessarily have to be a virgin, the source said.

Once born, the baby Jesus clone would be like any other kid, Savior of Mankind or not. Except that — one hopes — he'd usher in an age of Peace on Earth.

"We're not planning on raising the child in a lab and inculcating him with beliefs," the source said. "If this child is what we hope he is, he won't need to be raised that way."

Christian Science?

Corbis

The infant Jesus clone would just be like any other kid, Savior of Mankind or not.

The group hopes to obtain a small DNA sample from one of the countless Christian relics that devotees claim include a piece of Jesus' body — a drop of blood or strand of hair, for example.

The group hopes a relic owner will be kind enough to lend them a bit of genetic material and that a scientist would be willing to perform the cloning procedure — for free. To avoid as much controversy aspossible, the group refuses to accept donations from people outside the project.

There are potential pitfalls, of course. First are the ongoing questions about the authenticity of holy relics. The most famous example is the Shroud of Turin, venerated by some as the burial shroud of Jesus but dismissed as a medieval forgery by many others. Second, there's the challenge of cloning from a 2,000-year-old DNA sample.

Biologist Arthur Caplan, director the Center for Bioethics at the University of Pennsylvania, said cloning requires DNA that has been perfectly preserved, usually by freezing. It's unlikely any sample the group could find would meet that criterion.

"Any damage to the DNA would likely result in damaged, deformed or just non-starting cloning material," he said.

Traditional religious groups are skeptical, to say the least.

Bill Merrell, vice president of convention relations for the Southern Baptist Convention, called the project "the height of foolhardiness," "the highest silliness in the category of neither science nor religion" and "perfectly reprehensible," among other things.

The project misses the whole point of the Christian message, according to the Rev. Dr. Thomas Breiden-Thal, professor of Christian ethics at the New York-based General Theological Seminary of the Episcopal Church.

"In a sense, Christian theology asserts that every person is able to become another Jesus Christ," he said. "I would regard the attempt to bring back Jesus in the fashion (they) suggest as a crude misunderstanding of what is actually the goal of the Christian life, which is to become like Jesus ourselves."

Of course, the whole idea of cloning people brings up the possibility that several Christ "copies" might be possible — but The Second Coming Project is holding off on that for now.

"The more the merrier, but we'll start with one," the source said.

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Patent allows creation of man-animal hybrid

Special report: the ethics of genetics
http://www.observer.co.uk/international/story/0,6903,403160,00.html
Antony Barnett, public affairs editor
Sunday November 26, 2000

A biotech company has taken out a Europe-wide patent on a process which campaigners claim would allow 'chimeric' animals to be developed with body parts originating from humans.

An Australian company, Amrad, was granted the patent last year, which covers embryos containing cells both from humans and from 'mice, sheep, pigs, cattle, goats or fish'.

Church groups have already reacted with outrage, denouncing the patent as 'morally offensive'.

Details in the patent do not make it clear what use these mixed-species embryos would be put to, but experts are in no doubt that the potential is there to create a hybrid creature.

Dr Sue Mayer, director of Genewatch, said: 'The company is saying that it wants a patent on a process which could produce chimeric animals using cells from a whole range of species including humans. Many people will find the thought abhorrent.'

A spokesman for the Catholic Church said: 'To patent a process where human life is used as a kind of bank to deposit into animals is morally indefensible.'

Dr Donald Bruce, a spokesman for European churches on bioethics, said: 'This patent should never have been passed. If people are talking about using human cells in animals, that is completely unacceptable.'

Last month the European Patent Office claimed it would never grant a patent on mixed-species embryos as they are considered against 'public order and morality'. But this patent, discovered by a researcher in Greenpeace's German office, was taken out in January 1999 and has since been sold to US company Chemicon International.

Thomas Schweiger of Greenpeace called on the European Patent Office to withdraw it. He said: 'The chimeras may be non-human but they may contain human organs, body parts, nerve cells and even human genetic codes. The company does not give concrete medical uses and obviously intended to give the company broad monopoly rights on the process and chimeric creatures.'

Schweiger believes that one possible use might be to grow human organs in animals for transplantation.

According to the patent the chimera-creating process starts by isolating a special hormone, the objective of which is to stimulate the growth of embryonic cells; known as stem cells. These stem cells are the 'master cells' which could in theory be used to produce virtually any type of replacement tissue for a damaged body.

Amrad chief executive John Grace denied his company had ever conducted research in this field and said the patent would not be used to create animals with human cells. He said the process was mainly used to produce genetically engineered mice for research.

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Doctor Plans to Clone Human

NewsMax.com Wires
Saturday, Jan. 27, 2001

LEXINGTON, Ky. (UPI) – An Italian doctor and fertility expert plans to attempt to clone a human being within the next year.

Dr. Severino Antinori of Rome said in a hospital lecture that he was treating 10 couples, including one American couple, who are candidates for what he described as a therapeutic procedure. Antinori said this was the first time he had made his intentions public.

"Whether we like it or not, we will have
cloned individuals in the very near future," said Dr. Panos Zavos, a friend of Antinori, who delivered his lecture Thursday.

Zavos told Friday's Lexington Herald-Leader: "If it's done sensibly and responsibly enough, I think there is a place for
cloning in this world. It's going to happen."

Antonini, 55, is known for his work in assisted reproduction techniques and in developing methods that have allowed even women in their early 60s to get pregnant. He said the chance to help infertile couples outweighed the ethical objections to his procedure, which he described as safe.

"Life is important," he said. "The goal to be a father, to be a mother, is a human right, an absolute human right."

Antonini said the
cloning attempt likely would be made somewhere in the Mediterranean.

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US Firm Clones Pigs With Human DNA

By David Montgomery
http://www.thescotsman.co.uk/world.cfm?id=77931
6-5-1

Scientists have cloned pigs containing human DNA in a move which it is claimed could soon lead to humans being given animal organs.

The announcement of the creation of the "humanised" pigs moves scientists one step closer to creating a limitless supply of designer pigs whose hearts, lungs and other organs can be transplanted into humans.

The implications are enormous because of the chronic shortage of human donor organs. An estimated 6,500 British patients are waiting for an organ and two-thirds of them are expected to die without getting one.

Michael Bishop, president of Infigen, the American biotech company which cloned the pigs, said: "We,re now on the threshold of being able to produce pigs and clinically test their organs in human patients in one or two years."

In April, Midlothian-based PPL Therapeutics announced the birth of the world,s first cloned piglets.

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200 WOMEN TO BE IMPREGNATED WITH 'CLONED EMBRYOS'

A twenty-first century shock announcement is set to be made at the National Academy of Sciences in Washington this week: Up to 200 women will soon be impregnated with cloned embryos in the world's first attempt to produce a human clone!

MORE

The test, planned for November, possibly on a boat in international waters to avoid political interference, will use a technique similar to that developed to produce Dolly the sheep.

Up to 200 couples from several countries, including eight from Britain, were being selected for the cloning project, according to a report planned for publication on Sunday in Europe.

Italian embryologist Severino Antinori -- whose Rome clinic enabled a 62-year-old woman to have a baby in 1994 -- is planning to make the stunning announcement in the Nation's Capital. Antinori's team for the cloning drills consists of 20 international specialists.

NO AMERICANS IN TEST

No Americans will take part in the test, according to insiders familiar with the cloning plans.

White House sources warned that Antinori will not be permitted to impregnate any of the women within U.S. borders.

The announcement is expected to ignite an explosive debate about the ethics and safety of human cloning.

Developing...

-----------------------------------------------------------
Filed By Matt Drudge
Reports are moved when circumstances warrant
http://www.drudgereport.com for updates
(c)DRUDGE REPORT 2001
Not for reproduction without

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Stem Cell Research Faces FDA Hurdle With Mouse Cell Base, Tough Rules Apply

By Justin Gillis and Ceci Connolly
Washington Post Staff Writers
Friday, August 24, 2001; Page A01
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A53580-2001Aug23.html

Most or all of the human embryonic stem cell colonies approved for research funding under a new Bush administration policy have been mixed in the laboratory with mouse cells, which may create substantial hurdles for scientists trying to turn the colonies into treatments for Parkinson's disease, spinal-cord injuries and other ailments.

The cell colonies, or "lines," were created for early-stage research with no thought that they would become the only embryonic cells eligible for federal money. But that is the status President Bush conferred on them in his first prime-time address to the nation on Aug. 9.

The standard technique for creating human embryonic stem cell lines has been to extract cells from inside a microscopic embryo, then grow them atop embryonic mouse cells, known as "feeder" cells. The latter excrete some unknown nutritional or growth factor that helps the human cells stay healthy. Because they have been in close contact with mouse cells, the human cells pose a small but real risk of transferring potentially deadly animal viruses to people.

Because of that, under guidelines the Food and Drug Administration has been developing for several years, it would be difficult, though not impossible, to use the cells in human clinical tests.

Under the FDA rules, which are designed to prevent the accidental creation of a new plague, transplants of these embryonic cells into people would be treated as though they were "xenotransplants," or transplants of animal tissue. The guidelines impose stringent requirements on researchers and patients alike. They would likely rule out some groups of patients who might otherwise be eligible to participate in human stem cell tests -- notably, for instance, young diabetes patients whose disease can be treated in other ways.

The human embryonic stem cell lines reported in scientific literature were all grown in direct contact with mouse cells and might have picked up mouse viruses, which government officials acknowledged would bring them under the FDA policy.

Scientists are working on ways to grow human embryonic cell lines without using mouse cells, but any created after Bush's speech Aug. 9 would be ineligible for federal research money.

Patient groups and people who work with them expressed concern when told about the xenotransplant restrictions.

"This would be the exclamation point" on an already lengthy list of questions about the quantity and quality of the cell lines eligible for research funding under the Bush policy, said Kevin Ryder, a consultant to the American Cell Therapy Research Foundation, a New York foundation that supports research into many types of treatments using cells. "We would have a very difficult time getting those advanced into the clinical setting unless we get the FDA to make some exceptions down the road."

Most people on Capitol Hill are unaware of the issue, but as word of it began spreading late yesterday, some legislators expressed concern. "The president's going to have to make available lines of stem cells that will be available for the full measure of research anticipated," said Sen. John F. Kerry (D-Mass.) "If he doesn't, Congress will need to act to make that happen."

Jay Lefkowitz, a White House adviser who helped craft the Bush policy, said the administration was aware that the stem cell lines Bush approved for funding had been mixed with mouse cells and would come under the FDA's xenotransplant rules.

The White House concluded that the issue would not be a serious barrier at this stage, when scientists still need to do several years of fundamental laboratory work before human tests can begin, he said. By the time researchers are ready to begin those tests, he said, officials are confident that scientists will have found a way to grow stem cells without mouse cells, or will be able to work within the FDA's guidelines.

"President Bush has unlocked the door so that critical, basic research can be conducted in an area that is currently uncharted," Lefkowitz said. "To fulfill that mission, we believe the existing stem cell lines are more than adequate."

Opinion among scientists is mixed about how much of a problem the xenotransplant issue will be, but at the least, they say, it presents yet more practical difficulties in the execution of a policy already rife with them.

In the 15 days since Bush announced his policy, other lingering questions -- about how many cell lines exist, who owns them and how accessible they will be to academic scientists -- have gone largely unanswered by the National Institutes of Health and the Department of Health and Human Services. NIH administrators are negotiating with companies and labs to try to work out many of the details. Congressional hearings are scheduled in two weeks.

In an interview, a senior NIH administrator and an FDA regulator acknowledged that the xenotransplant issue could pose hurdles but said it was premature to speculate about how serious those might be.

"There is so little experience with these cells," said Lana Skirboll, director of science policy at the NIH. "There's a lot that needs to be done. I just think the scientific community is in a position that we have a lot more to learn."

FDA administrators who developed the xenotransplant policy declined to comment. But they pointed to written reports and meeting transcripts going back five years that make their position clear. The documents, posted on the Internet, leave little doubt that stem cells grown by current techniques would be covered. Although the guidelines are not final, officials said the agency has been following them.

Some laboratories that work with stem cells appear to be unaware of the policy; others are operating under the assumption that it will be a large hurdle in creating treatments from any of the existing cell lines. "It could be a real killer," said George Daley, a stem cell researcher at the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research in Cambridge, Mass.

Executives of BresaGen Inc., the U.S. unit of an Australian stem cell company, met with the FDA last spring and learned then that their four lines of human embryonic stem cells, all grown atop a layer of mouse cells, would be treated as xenotransplant products. "We were a little bit shell-shocked," said Allan Robins, senior vice president and chief scientific officer. "I think a lot of companies will see it as a large burden."

This view is not universal, however, even among scientists who oppose the Bush plan.

Hugh Auchincloss Jr., a surgeon at Harvard Medical School and chairman of an FDA committee that reviewed the xenotransplant issue, noted that the FDA policy, while stringent, is not an absolute bar to research. Indeed, several hundred patients have already participated in various types of xenotransplant tests, including the transfer of fetal pig cells into patients' brains in an attempt to treat Parkinson's disease.

Moreover, Auchincloss said, with enough time and lab work, scientists might be able to alleviate FDA concerns. He noted that human tests of stem cell therapies are probably years away, largely because scientists know so little about the cells.

In his speech Aug. 9, Bush said 60 genetically distinct embryonic stem cell lines had been derived by laboratories around the world and approved federal funding for work only on those cell lines. To reduce incentives for further destruction of embryos, he ruled out funding for any cell lines created after his speech.

Because they can be used to grow almost any kind of human tissue, which could then be used to repair ailing body parts, the cells offer considerable, but unproven, hope for cures. The cell lines were created from early-stage human embryos slated for destruction at fertility clinics. Many anti-abortion activists, one of Bush's most important constituencies, oppose the research.

Several scientists have said publicly that they are working on ways to grow embryonic stem cells without mixing them with mouse cells. But no scientist has publicly claimed to have created an entirely new cell line by such a method before Aug. 9.

That has led most scientists familiar with the issue to conclude that all 60 lines were probably created using mouse feeder cells and will have to be treated as xenotransplant products.

"I don't think there's any one of the 60 lines that has not been derived using mouse embryonic feeders," said Daley, of the Whitehead Institute.

However, the possibility cannot be entirely ruled out until the location and details of all 60 cell lines have been disclosed.

The implications of treating most or all of the lines as xenotransplant products would be substantial.

The draft FDA guidelines make clear that labs researching stem cells will have to meet special burdens to win approval for any human test involving xenotransplantation. They will have to perform extensive research and documentation on their cells that go beyond normal FDA requirements, including elaborate study of potential animal viruses. At a minimum, this will introduce delay and extra expense.

Given the complexity of the FDA restrictions, Robins, the BresaGen scientist, predicted that few companies would plunge into human tests of stem cells grown together with mouse cells. He said those will be used for research for the next few years, but eventually companies will create new cell lines grown only on human feeder cells. They will do so either with private money or by overturning the Bush limitations on federal funding, Robins and other researchers predicted.

In fact, it appears the FDA restrictions have already set off a behind-the-scenes race among labs to create -- and patent -- alternative means of growing stem cells that don't depend on mouse feeders.

The only company that has publicly claimed success with a mouse-free technique is Geron Corp. of Menlo Park, Calif. "We have accomplished it," said David Greenwood, the company's chief financial officer. But he declined to say whether Geron had managed to create any new stem cell lines using the technique before Aug. 9.

Several researchers predicted that if stem cells began to show promise, the politics would change, and they would win permission to work on new cell lines with federal money.

"If the research looks great and we're ready to go to human trials, we will need more stem cells," said Jeffrey Rothstein, a neurologist at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore who works in the field. "We'll turn to the president or Congress and get them to do the right thing."

Staff writer Rick Weiss contributed to this report.

© 2001 The Washington Post Company

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Scientists Develop Sperm-Free Conception

Michael Betsch, CNSNews.com
Thursday, July 12, 2001
http://www.newsmax.com/archives/articles/2001/7/12/140440.shtml

Doctors in Australia say they've found a way to fertilize a female's egg without male sperm. Using cells from any part of the body, Australian scientists said they have created embryos in mice, wire sources report.

The "sperm-free" technique could, in theory at least, enable a lesbian couple to have a baby, with one woman contributing an egg and the second to fertilize it, said Dr. Orly Lacham-Kaplan of Monash University, Melbourne.

Combining the genes of two women does present theoretical problems, however, because some aspects of development are controlled by a paternal gene.

But Lacham-Kaplan believes the problem can be overcome through the use of chemicals that trick the egg into carrying out the same steps used in natural circumstances. To make a long scientific explanation short, Lacham-Kaplan found a way of combining one set of chromosomes from a mouse egg with one set of chromosomes from an "adult" mouse cell.

Only after a few generations of testing in animals does Lacham-Kaplan intend to examine the technique in the humans.

Copyright CNSNews.com

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Career Women Rent Wombs To Beat Hassles Of Pregnancy

By Tessa Mayes
The Sunday Times - London
http://www.sunday-times.co.uk
7-8-1

A fertile 35-year-old business executive with three children hired another woman to carry her fourth child because she did not want to jeopardise her career.

The £43,000 procedure was organised by Conceptual Options, a private clinic in California. It not only enabled the woman to have her own fertilised egg implanted in a surrogate mother, but also allowed her to prearrange the sex of the baby.

"I want a daughter, but I don't want it to affect my career," said the woman, who already has three sons aged five, six and nine.

An increasing number of women are "renting" wombs for reasons of time pressure and vanity, with clinics in Britain as well as in the United States being asked to provide the service.

Successful businesswomen, actresses, athletes and models are among those opting for "social surrogacy". They cite career pressure, the pain of childbirth and the prospect of stretchmarks as the main reasons for avoiding pregnancy.

Theresa Erickson, a lawyer for Conceptual Options, said: "It's not for us to judge why people do not want to carry a baby, although I have turned people away. Women can just say, 'I need a surrogate', and doctors won't force her to allow them to check her fertility."

Paul Serhal, medical director at the Assisted Conception Unit affiliated to University College Hospital London (UCL), said he was recently approached by an actress in her thirties.

"She was concerned about stretchmarks and wanted a surrogate to carry a baby produced from her egg and her partner's sperm," Serhal said last week. "If she came back, I would ask the issues to be considered by the hospital ethics committee."

The Los Angeles-based Egg Donation and Surrogacy Programme said that 5%-10% of surrogacy requests are for social rather than medical reasons. It added that nearly half of those are from men who do not want their wives to go through the physical endurance of pregnancy. Recent cases include:

A Hollywood actress who hired a surrogate mother to carry a baby created from her egg and her lover's sperm. The surrogate had to sign a confidentiality agreement and, according to the clinic, "probably did it for the money".

A model who approached a clinic in the American state of Georgia for a surrogate because she feared that a normal pregnancy would lower her income while she carried the baby.

An American university professor who approached lawyers in Chicago to find out if she could have a social surrogacy. According to one lawyer close to the case she was worried about losing her tenure at the university if she became pregnant herself.

Cases of healthy women using surrogate mothers for social reasons are likely to anger campaigners for traditional families who believe that advances in fertility treatment have already gone to far.

Last week a clinic in America announced that it had offered sex selection to nearly 200 couples for social reasons. The Genetics and IVF Institute in Fairfax, Virginia, said patients chose the baby's sex for reasons of "family balancing".

Experts say it is only a matter of time before a child is conceived in Britain using social surrogacy. The practice is not illegal here, although the government does not encourage surrogacy. The health department said last week that it supports the Warnock report of 1984 which described social surrogacy as "ethically unacceptable". A spokesman said: "The government agrees that surrogacy is a last resort in cases where there are compelling medical reasons to do so."

However, undeterred by restrictive practices in this country, British couples who can afford it are travelling to America as "fertility tourists".

Andrew Vorzimer, an attorney at Vorzimer, Masserman & Chapman in Beverly Hills, said: "I have been approached by couples from all over the world, including models, athletes and celebrities, for vanity or employment reasons, but I have declined to help them."

Many American clinics do refuse to offer the service, arguing that it brings surrogacy services for reasons of infertility into disrepute. Sherrie Smith, programme administrator for the Centre for Surrogate Parenting and Egg Donation in Maryland, said: "If a woman is too busy to carry the child, or doesn't like the physical appearance of pregnancy and wants somebody to do that for her, she's probably too busy to be a mother."

Dr Peter Brinsden, medical director at Bourn Hall, the world's first IVF clinic which offers the largest surrogacy programme in Europe, said: "It is unacceptable to use assisted reproduction technology such as IVF in surrogacy cases or to employ sex selection for social reasons. The technology was developed for infertile couples. Responsible clinicians and scientists need to stop the renegades and not condone social surrogacy."

Others see nothing wrong in offering women social surrogacy services, however. Professor Lori Andrews of Chicago-Kent College of Law in America said: "Women are leading different lives today. They postpone child-bearing, don't have a husband or choose alternative methods such as surrogacy to avoid derailing their careers."

The British Medical Association publishes guidelines for doctors on surrogacy. "We are sceptical about social surrogacy. Surrogacy is a serious step, fraught with emotional risk and legal pitfalls. If natural childbirth is possible, it is infinitely preferred," it said.

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Brain cells of corpses are grown in test tube

By Steve Connor, Science Editor
03 May 2001
http://news.independent.co.uk/uk/science/story.jsp?story=70153

Transplant operations using the brain tissue of dead people could become reality after pioneering work has shown it is possible to grow nerve cells extracted from human corpses.

A team of medical researchers has taken a variety of living cells from the brains of dead people in an attempt to discover a new source of valuable stem cells, the "master" cells that can develop into the many specialised tissues of the body.

Using post-mortem samples from 23 children and adults, the scientists found they could grow at least three types of brain cell in a test tube for possible transplant operations on people with degenerative neurological conditions such as Parkinson's disease.

Past attempts at extracting brain cells from the dead and growing them in a laboratory have failed. This time, however, the scientists used specific growth factors known to sustain and stimulate isolated cells growing in a test tube.

The work, published in the journal Nature, was done by a team led by Fred Gage, of the Salk Institute in La Jolla, California. "I find it remarkable that we all have pockets of cells in our brains that can grow and differentiate throughout our lives and even after death," Professor Gage said.

The researchers took brain tissue from 23 dead people ranging in age from 11 weeks to 72 years old. They found that the younger the donor, the easier it was to grow a large number of viable cells in the laboratory.

The time after death when the cells were extracted varied from two hours to 20 hours. Three types of brain cell could be grown by the technique: neurons, which transmit messages in the form of electrical signals, astrocytes, which nourish and protect neurons, and oligodendrocytes, which insulate the nerve cells by wrapping them in a fatty sheath of myelin, a process disrupted in patients with multiple sclerosis.

So far the study had failed to discover whether these fully matured brain cells were merely transferred into the test tube, where they continued to live, or whether they developed from less specialised stem cells extracted from the dead patient, Professor Gage said.

"This study employed a pool of cells from extracted tissue. We haven't yet isolated individual cells from the pool and followed them to see if a single cell can give rise to multiple classes of brain cells," he said. "Such a cell would be a neural stem cell by a strict definition."

So far the work had concentrated on extracting brain tissue from people with neurological diseases but it might be more instructive to use post-mortem samples from individuals who were otherwise healthy, the scientists said.

"Cells recovered from healthy individuals could provide a model for understanding how to stimulate and guide the normal processes of brain cell growth and differentiation," Professor Gage said.

This could provide insights into how to stimulate cell growth in people with Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease, where the degeneration of healthy brain cells might be reversed by transplants of healthy tissue.

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Brain cells of corpses are grown in test tube

By Steve Connor, Science Editor
03 May 2001
http://news.independent.co.uk/uk/science/story.jsp?story=70153

Transplant operations using the brain tissue of dead people could become reality after pioneering work has shown it is possible to grow nerve cells extracted from human corpses.

A team of medical researchers has taken a variety of living cells from the brains of dead people in an attempt to discover a new source of valuable stem cells, the "master" cells that can develop into the many specialised tissues of the body.

Using post-mortem samples from 23 children and adults, the scientists found they could grow at least three types of brain cell in a test tube for possible transplant operations on people with degenerative neurological conditions such as Parkinson's disease.

Past attempts at extracting brain cells from the dead and growing them in a laboratory have failed. This time, however, the scientists used specific growth factors known to sustain and stimulate isolated cells growing in a test tube.

The work, published in the journal Nature, was done by a team led by Fred Gage, of the Salk Institute in La Jolla, California. "I find it remarkable that we all have pockets of cells in our brains that can grow and differentiate throughout our lives and even after death," Professor Gage said.

The researchers took brain tissue from 23 dead people ranging in age from 11 weeks to 72 years old. They found that the younger the donor, the easier it was to grow a large number of viable cells in the laboratory.

The time after death when the cells were extracted varied from two hours to 20 hours. Three types of brain cell could be grown by the technique: neurons, which transmit messages in the form of electrical signals, astrocytes, which nourish and protect neurons, and oligodendrocytes, which insulate the nerve cells by wrapping them in a fatty sheath of myelin, a process disrupted in patients with multiple sclerosis.

So far the study had failed to discover whether these fully matured brain cells were merely transferred into the test tube, where they continued to live, or whether they developed from less specialised stem cells extracted from the dead patient, Professor Gage said.

"This study employed a pool of cells from extracted tissue. We haven't yet isolated individual cells from the pool and followed them to see if a single cell can give rise to multiple classes of brain cells," he said. "Such a cell would be a neural stem cell by a strict definition."

So far the work had concentrated on extracting brain tissue from people with neurological diseases but it might be more instructive to use post-mortem samples from individuals who were otherwise healthy, the scientists said.

"Cells recovered from healthy individuals could provide a model for understanding how to stimulate and guide the normal processes of brain cell growth and differentiation," Professor Gage said.

This could provide insights into how to stimulate cell growth in people with Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease, where the degeneration of healthy brain cells might be reversed by transplants of healthy tissue.

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Artificial womb in progress
This appears to be legit.

http://www.observer.co.uk/international/story/0,6903,648024,00.html

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I think I can safely say, at this point, (that in view of the above information from THE SOP, THE SHEPHERD’S ROD AND WHAT THE BIBLE HAS TO SAY ON Almagation, along with the other various sources of world information on the subject, and also the current work in the last several years, up to the current year, 2012, of the Seed Giant, Monsanto, endeavoring to take full control of seed production in this country, and who knows, if not the whole world, - if some other giant conglomerate isn’t already, - and thus gain genetic control of food production, and, in view of whatever else man is conniving to do, - ONLY THE LORD KNOWS), - that I believe I can rest my case for including the topic of Amalgamation on this Site AS STRONG EVIDENCE THAT We ARE MOST DEFINITELY IN THE LAST YEARS OF EARTH’S HISTORY, AND THE DIVINE PLAN OF ETERNAL SALVATION. PROBATION WILL SOON COME TO AN EVERLASTING CLOSE, Brethren. THE QUESTION IS: ARE We READY, IN THE LORD???


SHALOM IN HIS MIGHTY NAME


Brother Randahl

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